Bouba the (Andean) bear joins the WCS Queen’s Zoo

November 21st, 2013

Bouba, WCS Queen’s Zoo’s newest Andean bear. Photo by Julie Larsen Maher / WCS.

The Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) is the only endemic bear on the continent of South America.  The IUCN lists the species as Vulnerable to risk of extinction, with habitat loss and hunting as drivers behind its dwindling numbers.  This elegant species is sometimes referred to as the spectacled bear due to occasional markings around the eyes that resemble glasses.

The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Queens Zoo has welcomed an ambassador of the Andean bear, a 2 year-old male named Bouba. Hailing from a zoo in France, Bouba will share his new home with a female friend of the same species, Spangles.

WCS conducts research on Andean bears across multiple countries in South America and aims to develop local habitat conservation of the Andean bear and mitigate threats such as human-wildlife conflict. WCS works in tandem with Cleveland Metroparks Zoo and Cleveland Zoological Society, the Andean Bear Conservation Alliance, and other supporters to protect the future of the Andean bear. You can learn more about their efforts or donate to the projects by going to wcs.org.

Picture: tropical beach in Indonesia

March 28th, 2012


The beach on Peucang Island, Java. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

Picture: Hammerhead shark

March 28th, 2012

Hammerhead shark
Hammerhead shark. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

Picture: Red-eyed tree frog

March 26th, 2012

RED-EYED TREE FROG
Photo by Rhett A. Butler.

1,000 new species discovered in New Guinea

June 27th, 2011

Blue monitor lizard
Varanus macraei, a monitor lizard first described in 2001, lives on the island of Batanta. WWF calls it “one of the most spectacular reptile discoveries anywhere… with a mesmerising pattern of turquoise and blue.” Photo © Lutz Obelgonner.

Scientists discovered more than 1,000 previously unknown species during a decade of research in New Guinea (slideshow), says a new report from WWF.

Final Frontier: Newly Discovered species of New Guinea (1998 – 2008) is a tally of 10 years’ worth of discoveries by scientists working on the world’s second largest island.

While the majority of 1,060 species listed are plants and insects, the inventory includes 134 amphibians, 71 fish, 43 reptiles, 12 mammals, and 2 birds.

More pictures at Turquoise ‘dragon’ among 1,000 new species discovered in New Guinea.

What does a baby moose look like? (photos)

June 12th, 2011

Moose and mom are doing fine. Photo courtesy of ZSL's Whipsnade Zoo.
Moose and mom are doing fine. Photo courtesy of ZSL’s Whipsnade Zoo.

It’s true that moose, also known as European elk (Alces alces), are odd looking animals, yet that doesn’t prevent their babies from being as endearing as any others. This baby moose, named Chocolate (get it?), was born at Zoological Society of London’s (ZSL) Whipsnade Zoo in late May.

The moose are apart of the European Breeding Program. Photo courtesy of ZSL's Whipsnade Zoo.
The moose are apart of the European Breeding Program. Photo courtesy of ZSL’s Whipsnade Zoo.

A closer look at Chocolate, the moose. Photo courtesy of ZSL's Whipsnade Zoo..
A closer look at Chocolate, the moose. Photo courtesy of ZSL’s Whipsnade Zoo.

Happy world oceans day! (photos)

June 8th, 2011

Coastline in Colombia. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Coastline in Colombia. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Celebrated since 1992, today is World Oceans Day! As apart of the day’s festivities, conservation organization Oceana is asking people to become Ocean Heroes by pledging to recycle, clean up a local waterway, or eat only sustainable seafood for the summer!

Purple-striped jellyfish at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Purple-striped jellyfish at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Leopard shark in a kelp forest at Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Leopard shark in a kelp forest at Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Overlooking the ocean at dawn on Bunaken Island in Indonesia. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Overlooking the ocean at dawn on Bunaken Island in Indonesia. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Tufted puffin in Alaska. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Tufted puffin in Alaska. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mangroves and seagrass in Belize. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler
Mangroves and seagrass in Belize. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Red starfish at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Red starfish at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Rain coming in over beach in Suriname. Photo by: Jeremy Hance.
Rain coming in over beach in Suriname. Photo by: Jeremy Hance..

Moon jellyfish (Aurelia labiata) at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Moon jellyfish (Aurelia labiata)at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Critically Endangered leatherback sea turtle returning to the sea in Suriname after laying eggs. Photo by: Jeremy Hance.
Critically Endangered leatherback sea turtle returning to the sea in Suriname after laying eggs. Photo by: Jeremy Hance..

Islands off Bird's Head, northern New Guinea . Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Islands off Bird’s Head, northern New Guinea . Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Humpback breaching in Alaska. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Humpback breaching in Alaska. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Green sea anemone at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Green sea anemone at the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Overlooking the ocean at sunset on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Overlooking the ocean at sunset on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Antelope release! (photos)

June 7th, 2011

Red hartebeest release. Photo courtesy of Colchester Zoo: Action for the Wild.
Red hartebeest release. Photo courtesy of Colchester Zoo: Action for the Wild.

Three antelope species were recently released at the Umphafa Private Nature Reserve in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa in an ongoing effort to restore an over-cultivated area. In all 7 impala, 21 red hartebeest, and 22 blue wildebeest were released.

“These recent releases are exciting developments for UmPhafa. The releases of the wildebeest represent the first for this species on UmPhafa and the new populations of red hartebeest and impala will serve to top up our existing herds. It is hoped that these species will go on to breed in the future and help us on our way to reaching carrying capacity for these species,” said Rebecca Perry, Conservation Director, in a press release.

The reserve was opened in 2006 by Action for the Wild, the conservation organization of Colchester Zoo. To date, 13 species have been released in the 5,000 hectare protected area, including giraffe, zebra, blesbok, servals, African rock pythons, common reedbuck, nyala, waterbuck, leopard tortoises and white rhinos.

Impala release. Photo courtesy of Colchester Zoo: Action for the Wild.
Impala release. Photo courtesy of Colchester Zoo: Action for the Wild.

Blue wildebeest release. Photo courtesy of Colchester Zoo: Action for the Wild.
Blue wildebeest release. Photo courtesy of Colchester Zoo: Action for the Wild.

Happy world turtle day! (photos)

May 23rd, 2011

Baby marine turtle taking its first step out to sea in Costa Rica. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Baby marine turtle taking its first step out to sea in Costa Rica. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Yes, there is a World Turtle Day created by the American Tortoise Rescue! And today (May 23rd) is that day!

Ancient leopard tortoise in Uganda. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Ancient leopard tortoise in Uganda. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Sumatran freshwater turtle. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Sumatran freshwater turtle. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Leatherback sea turtle returning to the sea after laying eggs in Suriname. Photo by: Jeremy Hance.
Sumatran freshwater turtle. Photo by: Jeremy Hance.

Radiated tortoise in Madagascar. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Radiated tortoise in Madagascar. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

T-rex leech discovered in a person’s nose just one of the top ten new species of 2010 (photos)

May 23rd, 2011

The International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University has selected its top ten new species from 2010. While all the species are extraordinary, one was discovered in a most baffling--one may say painful--manner: taken from the nasal mucous membrane of a person in a Peruvian clinic. This 2-inch leech is named Tyrannobdella rex, which means 'tyrant leech king', because of a resemblance to the extinct T-Rex: both share a massive jaw and gigantic teeth. Imagine having that up your nose! The image above shows  the Tyrannobdella rex's anterior sucker exhibiting velar mouth and longitudinal slit through which the dorsal jaw protrudes when feeding. Scale bar is 1 mm.
The International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University has selected its top ten new species from 2010. While all the species are extraordinary, one was discovered in a most baffling, manner: taken from the nasal mucous membrane of a person in a Peruvian clinic. This 2-inch leech is named Tyrannobdella rex, which means ‘tyrant leech king’, because of a resemblance to the extinct T-Rex: both share a massive jaw and gigantic teeth. Imagine having that up your nose! The image above shows the Tyrannobdella rex’s anterior sucker exhibiting velar mouth and longitudinal slit through which the dorsal jaw protrudes when feeding. Scale bar is 1 mm. .

The T-rex nose-embedding leech is not the only species though. There’s also the Mozart glowing mushroom, the fruit-eating giant lizard, the spider that weaves the strongest silk, the antediluvian cockroach, among other biological marvels!

To read more and see photos:

Photos: the top ten new species discovered in 2010

(05/23/2011) If we had to characterize our understanding of life on Earth as either ignorant or knowledgeable, the former would be most correct. In 250 years of rigorous taxonomic work researchers have cataloged nearly two million species, however scientists estimate the total number of species on Earth is at least five million and perhaps up to a hundred million. This means every year thousands of new species are discovered by researchers, and from these thousands, the International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University selects ten especially notable new species.