Pictures of baby animals with their mothers for Mother’s Day

May 8th, 2011

Mother tarsier and baby on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother tarsier and baby on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother and baby orangutan in tree in Sumatra. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother and baby orangutan in tree in Sumatra. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother Panamanian golden frog with green baby. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother Panamanian golden frog with green baby. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

 Southern Tree Hyrax with baby in Kenya. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Southern Tree Hyrax with baby in Kenya. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

 Baby crowned lemur clinging to its mother in Madagascar. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Baby crowned lemur clinging to its mother in Madagascar. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) with babies in Belize. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) with babies in Belize. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother lion sleeping with cubs in Kenya. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother lion sleeping with cubs in Kenya. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother and baby Matschie's Tree-kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei). Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother and baby Matschie’s Tree-kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei). Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother ringtail lemur with baby on stomach. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother ringtail lemur with baby on stomach. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Mother capybara with baby in Brazil. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
Mother capybara with baby in Brazil. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

African elephant (Loxodonta africana) mom and juvenile drinking in the Chobe River . Photo by: Tiffany Roufs.
African elephant (Loxodonta africana) mom and juvenile drinking in the Chobe River . Photo by: Tiffany Roufs.

Smiling mothers with babies on their backs in the Sacred Valley near Ollantaytambo outside of Cuzco, Peru. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.
And people too! Smiling mothers with babies on their backs in the Sacred Valley near Ollantaytambo outside of Cuzco, Peru. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Photo: big-eared endangered monkey born at zoo

April 14th, 2011


A three-week old baby white-naped mangabey (Cercocebus atys lunulatus) has been named ‘Hope’ given that her species is vanishing from the wild. Photo by: James Godwin, ZSL.

Born at the Zoological Society of London’s (ZSL) London Zoo, this white-naped mangabey (Cercocebus atys lunulatus) represents one of the Africa’s most imperiled monkeys and is apart of the European Endangered species Programme (EEP). The white-naped mangabey is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List and is a subspecies of the sooty mangabey (Cercocebus atys). Native to West Africa, Hope’s wild relatives are threatened by deforestation and bushmeat hunting. Researchers believe the population has been cut in half in the past 30 years.


A close-up of Hope. Photo courtesy of ZSL.

Photo: black-and-white colobus hanging out

March 14th, 2011


A black-and-white colobus (Colobus angolensis) in Kenya. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

Photos: the gentle lemur

March 2nd, 2011


The world’s bamboo lemurs are also known by the more evocative name, the gentle lemurs. Currently these lemurs are separated into five species, all of which are threatened with extinction. These photos are of the Eastern Lesser Bamboo Lemur which is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN Red List. Photos by Rhett A. Butler.

More photos of bamboo lemurs.

Activism: oil in Virunga National Park

March 1st, 2011

Note: mongabay.com does not endorse the action below, but believes its readers may be interested in taking action or discussing the issue in comments.


Male gorilla in Gabon. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

The government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is currently considering allowing oil companies SOCO and Dominion into Virunga National Park for drilling. Home to a quarter of the world’s mountain gorillas, as well as chimpanzees, hippos, lions, forest elephants, and rare birds Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is one of Africa’s most biodiverse parks and is classified by the UN as a World Heritage Site. Conservation organizations and the UN have come out against the plans to open a portion of the park to drilling.

The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) has started a petition against the mine: Urgent: help stop oil exploration inside one of Africa’s most iconic national parks.

To read more about the prospect of drilling in Virunga National Park:

Oil company charged after allegedly forcing entry into Virunga National Park

(02/21/2011) The Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) national parks authority, ICCN, has filed a suit against oil company, SOCO International, for allegedly forcing entry into Virunga National Park. The legal row comes amid revelations that two oil companies, SOCO and Dominion Petroleum, are exploring the park for oil.

UN and conservation organizations condemn big oil’s plan to drill in Virunga National Park

(01/20/2011) WWF, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and the UN have all recently expressed concerns about two oil companies’ plan to explore for oil in Africa’s oldest and famed Virunga National Park. Home to a quarter of the world’s mountain gorillas, as well as chimpanzees, hippos, lions, forest elephants, and rare birds Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is one of Africa’s most biodiverse parks and is classified by the UN as a World Heritage Site. But according to WWF plans by oil companies SOCO International and Dominion Petroleum could jeopardize not only the wildlife and ecosystems, but also local people.

Photo: Critically Endangered Mexican spider monkey with baby

February 27th, 2011

The Mexican spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi vellerosus), a subspecies of Geoffroy's spider monkey, is classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List. Surviving in Mexico and parts of Central America, the species has been decimated by habitat loss. Photos by: Rhett A. Butler.
The Mexican spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi vellerosus), a subspecies of Geoffroy’s spider monkey, is classified as Critically Endangered by the IUCN Red List. Surviving in Mexico and parts of Central America, the species has been decimated by habitat loss. These shots were taken in Mexico. Photos by: Rhett A. Butler.

Photos: baby gorilla takes first steps

February 15th, 2011

Nicknamed 'Tiny', a three-month old baby male gorilla took his first steps a the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) Zoo. Tiny had not left his mother since birth, but the 12-year-old mom, named Mjukuu, encouraged him to begin exploring his home. While Tiny is beginning to get his first teeth, keepers say he has awhile to go before reaching a full-sized silverback male. Photos courtesy of ZSL.

Nicknamed ‘Tiny’, a three-month old baby male gorilla took his first steps a the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) Zoo. Tiny had not left his mother since birth, but the 12-year-old mom, named Mjukuu, encouraged him to begin exploring his home. While Tiny is beginning to get his first teeth, keepers say he has awhile to go before reaching a full-sized silverback male. Photos courtesy of ZSL.

Video: lemur evolution

February 13th, 2011

From the Science Channel show Mutant Planet, this episode on Madagascar looks at the bizarre turns evolution takes on one of the world’s most unique islands.

To find out more information and see more videos from the production: Mutant Planet: Madagascar.

Picture: Leaf monkey in Sumatra

January 13th, 2011


Thomas’ Leaf Monkey in Gunung Leuser N.P., Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler

Thomas’ Leaf Monkey is a species found in Sumatra, Indonesia. It typically lives in groups from 10-20 individuals and feeds on fruit, young leaves, seeds, and occasionally insects.

More pictures of Thomas’s Leaf Monkey

Leaping lemur (picture & video)

January 4th, 2011


Verreaux’s sifaka takes flight in Berenty. Photo by Rhett A. Butler

Verreaux’s sifaka is a lemur which can be spotted in Madagascar’s deciduous forest habitats including Andohahela, Berenty, Beza-Mahafaly, Isalo, and Kirindy.

While sifakas are generally found in trees where they are capable jumpers and feed on fruit, flowers, wood, bark and leaves, they are best known for their “dancing.” Since trees in their habitat are often dispersed, sifakas cross open ground by sashaying on their hind legs with arms aloft. There are few animal sights more entertaining than witnessing a group of sifakas crossing a road.


Dancing lemur attracts tourists to island of Madagascar

More photos of sifakas