Picture: 3D mapping of rainforests

In 2009, researchers with the Carnegie Institution, World Wildlife Fund, Amazon Conservation Association, and the Ministry of Environment, Peru used satellite images and airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), together with field plots, to map aboveground carbon stocks and emissions at 0.1-ha resolution over 4.3 million ha of the Peruvian Amazon. To measure forest deforestation, degradation, and regrowth, the researchers collected 27 LiDAR survey areas covering a total of 514,317 ha were collected throughout the 4.3 million ha region, at a spatial resolution of less than one meter.

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Activism: CREDO joins the fight against the Belo Monte dam

Note: mongabay.com does not endorse the action below, but believes its readers may be interested in taking action or discussing the issue in comments. Credo, the progressive for-profit cell phone company, has thrown its hat in the ring in the environmental activists’ battle against the Belo Monte dam, joining International Rivers, Amazon Watch, and James Cameron. Credo now urges its activists to sign a petition, which states in...

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Without oversight and safegaurds, REDD may be caught up in web of corruption

The issue of measurement, reporting and verification of carbon levels is set for the agenda at COP 16 in Cancun next month. Experts warn, however, that more attention must be given to the monitoring and reporting of REDD+ financial flows, which stand to be caught up in complex webs of corruption. There will be a lot at stake. In Copenhagen last year developed countries committed new and additional resources to forestry worth $30 billion for 2010-12, and set out to mobilise $100 billion annually from 2020 to address the needs of developing countries. If any of that money makes its way into bank accounts overseas, the money trail becomes difficult to follow.

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New Guinea from above
Nov18

New Guinea from above

Winding river makes its way to the sea in the lowland rainforests of west New Guinea. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler. Click to see more photos of New Guinea.

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Which came first the forest or the rain?
Oct20

Which came first the forest or the rain?

By: Douglas Sheil Repost from Bwindi Researchers on Wildlife Direct During the rainy season in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, there’s an impressive storm and our water tanks overflow nearly every day. We’re in the equatorial rain forest after all: we have the location, trees and weather to prove it. But is the forest here because of the rain or is it the other way around? Being in a highland area we probably get...

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Tool for comparing value of forest conservation to logging, palm oil

A new tool developed by Lian Pin Koh of ETH Zurich allows users to quickly compare the value of various forms of land use, including oil palm plantation development, logging, and carbon conservation for REDD+ payments. The web-based tool provides a rough estimate for the net present value of economic activities as well as the impact on biodiversity. The tool is available at LU...

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Avatar Firmly Keeps the Con in Conservation
Sep24

Avatar Firmly Keeps the Con in Conservation

Erik Meijaard explains why he thinks that Avatar-like solutions are particularly helpful in conservation.

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